Archive for the ‘Links’ category

Bookseller of Silicon Roundabout Knocked Down

June 6th, 2014

A month ago a car from a side road smacked into my bicycle at 8am without looking and knocked me down. I didn’t open my bookshop. I couldn’t work at  my own business premises for the entire first week. The aftermath took hold.  Five hospital visits later, my situation remains unresolved.

At the time of impact, the right hand cycle handlebar gored me. My stomach muscles ripped aside and my liver and colon were bruised. A scan on the day showed spots on my liver and the pain was intense. 4 weeks later the pain remains but has diminished. I phoned my GP 3 days running but now have to anxiously sit out the weekend to wait for a comment on the latest CT triple scan.

A  hospital physio diagnosed my left wrist as possibly fractured.  I am left-handed. It’d been in severe pain for 3 weeks. Two visits later, my wrist was in plaster and my scaphoid can finally begin to heal over the forthcoming 6 weeks.

Exhaustion is usually a temporary state; but, since my road accident, it grips me from when I wake until I sleep at night. My sleep is fitful now whereas I was regularly the soundest sleeper you could imagine.

I cannot drive a car or ride a bike; can only write or perform any fine motor skills with my left hand with severe discomfort.  Lifting is painful for my wrist and my abdomen.  My social life revolved around sport- now my football, squash, badminton and tennis kit are unused.

The fact is that I am not a physical or emotional wreck, but I feel like one; other people’s worse circumstances & suffering  to one side, the aftermath of my bike accident has been profound for me. It does help for me to write feelings down when I feel particularly low.

I hope my conscientious, light-hearted,  relaxed, well-exercised,  old Bookseller of Silicon Roundabout returns in the next month or so.

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Some thoughts on the Novel

February 15th, 2014

A customer recently told me that he can’t stand to read novels anymore because spending so much time reading newspapers has meant he finds it difficult to read unbroken lines.

Which got me to thinking: what have us booksellers been belly-aching about Amazon for? We’ve misdirected our ire. I’ve identified the true villains, and I’ve come up with the solution. It’s simple; I’ll just set fire to the newsagents. Or if not the newsagents then perhaps Rebekah Brooks… Hugh Grant would cheer me on. We could shoot a grisly sequel to Notting Hill.

But putting threats of arson and witch-burnings aside, there certainly has been a crisis of confidence in the novel as a form in the last 10 years. Take Philip Roth. He said in 2009 that novels will become a ‘cultic’ minority enthusiasm within 25 years, and it’s ‘the print that’s the problem, it’s the book, the object itself’. But we can take with a pinch of salt. Or better sugar. After all, can anyone remember the last time Roth said something that wasn’t unpalatably bitter?

People have written a lot about declining attention spans in the digital age and how this has created an apathetic attitude towards long form fiction. But then a lot of people have also been writing very long books, and a lot of people have been reading them. We have also been handing out awards for them – the Booker Prize for Eleanor Catton’s 832-page clobbering wedge The Luminaries being one example.

So what are we to make of this then? On the one hand we are being told by the likes of Jonathan Franzen that we are all going to be transformed into drivelling dirges able only to conceptualise narratives in terms of trending hashtags, and on the other hand we are reading and slapping prizes on books that make Middlemarch seem mercifully short. It’s very confusing.

First off I think that our tendency towards these long novels goes some way to put paid to Roth’s criticism of the book as an object. The physical size of these books shows that we are not as concerned with their obtrusiveness as much as has been thought.

Secondly I think the way that our television viewing habits have changed provide an illuminating analogy when it comes to thinking about our attention spans. American drama series that focus on one continuous narrative, stretched over 5 or six series, each with at least 12 hour long episodes have become more and more popular. Not only that, but instead of being released serially, entertainment companies such as Netflix are releasing these shows to viewers all at once (the second series of House of Cards which was released yesterday being a fine example). These shows are far more like novels than films, in their structure and their scope. And our hunger for them shows that we haven’t lost interest in the big stories and big characters that only a novel can tell and bring to life.

The schizophrenic tendency that Franzen has identified certainly applies to the way that we communicate with one another, which is becoming more and more telegraphic. But it’s not the death knell for the novel. Something will get it in the end, but it’s not going to be twitter. There’s appetite for stories yet.

SF

The Bookseller of Silicon Roundabout